Bboy Podcast Ep. 7 – Discovering your Style with MATT ACTION @bboymattaction

Bboy Podcast Ep. 7 – Discovering your Style with MATT ACTION @bboymattaction

What’s going on guys, Wolvi here. Just want to say a big big thank you for checking out this episode of the podcast. On this episode we have our featured guest Aya!  Click play above to listen to the episode!

Introduction

This next episode of the podcast we are on the mic with is Matthew Perez better known as Matt Action @bboymattaction from Rock Force Crew and Waseda Breakers. He is currently based in Tokyo but grew up in Fremont, California. His teachers include members of Beatz N Pieces, Soul Control, Skill Methodz, and of course Rock Force and Waseda Breakers.

In addition to his breaking education, he also received a master’s in business administration from Waseda University in Tokyo. Combining what he learned in school and breaking has led to him being a founding member of Spin Control LLC @thespincontrol , a company that innovates clothing to push breaking culture forward.

Support the show and spread the message of the thought leaders in our culture. Peace and love.

Highlights

The Early Days (3:03)

Getting Down with Rock Force (9:40)

Finding and Becoming your Character (16:03)

Battle Strategy (19:13)

Getting down with Waseda Breakers (23:18)

The Crew Training (25:36)

The Solo Training (27:32)

Conditioning (33:12)

Parting Advice for Bboys and Bgirls (38:27)

Outro

And there we have it guys bboy Matt action, Rock Force Crew, Waseda Breakers, really dope to have him on the show and share his unique perspective on coming up with these well renowned b-boys and being parts of very well renowned crews. And I’m really excited to put what he shared in the show into practice in my own training and actually I just watched a head spin tutorial that Matt action did on Vincanity his channel so thanks Matt learning headpsins right now appreciate bro. So if you want a head spin workshop in your town hit him up it’ll be dope I promise. Definitely check him out spincontrol.co instagram.com/thespincontrol or @bboymattaction as he said in the interview he’s got some stuff coming up with spin control so definitely follow and make sure you don’t miss what he’s got going on.

While you’re checking Matt and spin control on Instagram be sure to give us a follow to @_inthecypher. There I share some behind the scenes and also announced the new guests. I got a bunch of people DMing me on guests that they want to have on the show if so if you’re not following us yet give us a follow; either comment on a photo or DM me a b-boy or b-girl you want me to have on the show and even better, let me know exactly what you want to ask them. It’s my goal with this podcast to help you so if I know exactly the information that you want I will do my best to get it for you.

I really appreciate the support guys it’s been crazy these past couple weeks but yeah. I’m very excited for this next episode to come out we’ve had a lot of people commenting and DMing me about this b-boying trying to get him on the show that had a bunch of questions lined up for him, it was a really really dope interview and I’m really excited for this one go live so follow us on Instagram people know right away who it is and when I’m gonna drop it. Until then guys peace out, take care, and I’ll catch you on the next episode. 

More on Matt:

spincontrol.co | instagram.com/thespincontrol | instagram.com/bboymattaction

FOLLOW US:

Listen on YouTube: https://youtu.be/WJxQdJlVcN4

Website http://inthecypher.com/ | Instagram https://www.instagram.com/_inthecypher/ | Facebook https://www.facebook.com/INTHECYPHER/

 

Transcript

What’s going on guys! Thank you for joining me on this episode of the podcast. On this episode we got Matt Action on the mic. Really stoked to have him on the show. I originally met him last year in a Seattle Washington and a jam called sweet 16. Him and his squad ended up winning the jam I went to talk to him afterwards and he was super humble super passionate about his dance and that is why I want to get him on the mic for this episode. Now Matt has been affiliated with some really well renowned crew such as rock force and was Waseda breakers, but during has come up he’s been mentored by a lot of very reputable b-boys as well from various crews and you’ll probably know all of them. So super cool to get that perspective just to see how that influenced his style and where he’s at now with his dance. So let’s get right into this episode it’s a good one.

What’s going on guys Wolvi here and welcome to the cypher. On the in the cypher b-boy podcast I interview highly talented and experienced b-boys and b-girls and they shared their stories and knowledge with you to help you become a better dancer. Now joining me on the mic for this episode is Matthew Kimera Perez but you probably know him as Matt Action from rock force crew and Waseda breakers. He’s currently based in Tokyo but grew up in Fremont California. His teachers include members of beats and pieces, soul control, skill methods, and of course rock force and Waseda breakers. In addition to his breaking education, he also received a Masters in Business Administration from Waseda University in Tokyo. Combining what he learned in school and breaking has led him to become a founding member of spin control LLC, a company that innovates clothing to push breaking culture forward. All right Matthew really stoked to have you on the mic thank you for joining me you ready to get into it bro? Let’s do it.

Dope man I’m excited for this one. Yeah me too I’m excited to see what happens with this interview let’s do it. All right chill. Okay let’s just get started by telling us a little bit more about your personal life outside of breakin.

Okay just in general? Yeah just in general what you got going on what you like to do in your spare time. All right well I live in Tokyo, and I’m married to a Canadian Japanese person, she’s actually full Japanese but she grew up in Vancouver. So what I do outside of breakin is I hang out with her a lot, we go around Tokyo and do whatever we kind of feel like doing. Lots of good food out here stuff like that so yeah pretty much outside of breaking is hanging out with her or hanging off my my friends from Japan right now. Yeah it’s just normal human stuff you know.

Dope are usually originally from Japan?

No I’m from a town called Fremont in the Bay Area in California and I grew up there until I was about 18 and then I moved to San Jose for college and then I studied abroad for a year in Tokyo and I really liked it and so after doing that I went back finished school in San Jose and then I went to do a master’s of business degree at a school called Waseda University in Tokyo. So I ended up here and I was working out here and I met my wife and then I just decided alright I’m moving out here so that’s how I ended up in Tokyo again

Solid ok that’s dope and uh I got asked then where along those lines did you start breaking?

I started breaking when I was about 13, there was some kids that I started with that week they called themselves the AE it was like Asian something is just much Asian kids high school it’s like Jason, Jonathan Shay Ben Yen and Arnold Hwa and they were just doing flips and they thought it was breaking they didn’t really know what they were doing was tricking but I had a little bit of gymnastic experience so I was like oh I could flip better than them so like from the get I was just in battle mode trying to beat people you know. So I went out I was actually super chubby at the time and I just started like trying to flip and I totally got hurt and I was the worst one out of all of them so around 13 I kind of just like started trying to do stuff on the grass. Yeah from there yeah it’s kind of just a wrap from there got into it and got deeper as things went on you know mentors and whatnot. Dope what kind of who are your mentors I guess? Yeah so those those first guys we were trying to learn more about breaking and so we would just locally look around and we’ve met some people from different high schools and those people brought us to the junior college where there’s this b-boy name power surge from crew called beats n pieces and he had a class at this studio every Friday but it was like a college campus studio, he was teaching breaking breaking 101 I think is what it was called, so we snuck in.

We totally weren’t paying tuition or anything we just snuck in and like wanted to see what was up and he he was super cool he’s just a b-boy you know and he he kind of took me under his wing after that after a few months. So we I started breaking with them every I start breaking with beats n pieces crew like twice a week and I just really wanted to get down with that crew and then from surge I met so many other mentors like RJ, bboy cool Raul is his name, all the other beats n pieces guys, Megaman, that’s how I got introduced his soul control with Charles, and and yeah kind of went went from there I would say.

Very cool with the name like power surge he must be pretty cool. He’s a cool guy man he’s like actually he like he used to have some really good windmills like they were insane, I don’t know about now but he had like all the like I don’t know like into in the early 2000s there was like a bar for power and I think he he kind of had the basic power down but his name was Sergio so they gave him the name power surge and it was dope like I always wanted a cool name like that actually got my bboy name from him. He tried to call me Matt business for a while like some other stuff it just like wasn’t sticking and one day it just became Matt action and I I don’t know how it happened but I’m cool with it now.

chill, okay dope so then you linked up with soul control?

Yes so I represented beats and pieces for a really long time and while I was there in my hometown like I said is Fremont there’s this other bboy named Megaman and before I’d started braking he kind of had retired he’d already been to UK b-boy champs he’d been to like I think he’d been in like battle of the year they won the first freestyle session ever and he had already retired. So I didn’t really meet him until one day he just kind of came into the studio because he knew search and I met him and then after that I saw how crazy his power moves were and I always wanted a head spin. I could already flare, I could already like do some really bad windmills and he kind of came in and he just gave me all the advice that I needed and he didn’t come in a lot because he’s Megaman it’s like a crazy entrepreneur so he’s just like always doing other things now you know he still loves breaking but his main focuses those other things.

So he’d come in once in a while and then eventually I got his phone number I would be like I would call the guy at practice to be like hey this isn’t working like what am I doing wrong with this and he’d be like oh just just do this and this and this like if you talk to him he’s like the most upbeat happy guy he’s like yeah just just do that and let him call me back in a couple weeks so I would just call it and he would give me advice and then when he came in like I think that was a really big turning point for me because I learned from Power Surge I learned so much footwork.

Power surge is a footwork head and he’s got some dope footwork for sure I feel like he was underrated and then he wanted me to always get into more tops power surge but once I saw him make his power I was just like yo I got I gotta get that and that’s kind of where that’s kind of where I went for a long time was down that power route and I think that’s kind of where I got more my reputation from was being able to do power in the Bay Area because in the bay there were so many amazing dancers there’s like you had like roxrite, kid David, Morris Kareem, flexum. Like it was insane back then and the that generation they all kind of went different ways they all like kind of had life happens I moved to LA some of other places and then the bay was just empty and then I was one of the only few people who could like really execute high-level moves and I think that’s where I started to kind of get my shine was from there.

Totally and that’s I guess I discovered you as you’re such a I don’t know how to say like Dynamic dynamic explosive b-boy anyways that’s how I’d describe your style anyways you know.

That thanks man I feel like I’m you know I try to keep it going but the the kids these days are so crazy and I feel like myself as a dancer I’ve really changed I still do power and most of what I show on my like Instagram and stuff is gonna be power but I do feel like the core of my dance is now a lot different than just power so that’s been a cool little change especially since getting into rock force the focus is really shifted I think in my dance.

Totally and can you maybe go into what you mean by that I know you’re you’re pretty well-rounded like you got some really dope patterns as well like in your footwork but what do you mean by uh I guess getting into rock force now that changed your your style. Yeah well when I met well I got into rock force after I got out of beats and pieces. Beats and pieces was just like everybody was kind of getting older the demographic of it was just changing and anyway I got out of it and then Paulski approached me and he wanted me to to get down with with rock force and I was like all right and so I went to a practice and the first thing that they made me do was like two hours of two steps man like I was just going to steps and he was like nah the feeling you got had the feeling and like it was just like Paulskis really intense man like I feel like the guy probably eats eats his Oreos in the morning to Wu-Tang he’s an intense guy but it’s dope like he loves the culture so much and it shows in the way he teaches in the way he like works with his students.

So he made me like basically just start from Ground Zero you know he like made me go through all the music from the 70s when it started going up to – now and that was something that I don’t think Megaman ever really cared not that he doesn’t care I think he appreciates it but it’s not something that he studies in that respect you know he was more about the dynamics. So a lot of my earlier dancing is more about the dynamics and I think now I’m more about like I’m more about I’ve realized that I can learn all the dynamics and now I’m really trying to create something of my own a little bit more and really taking the heritage of the dance and make sure that I I like I’m contributing something rather than just like you know doing crazy shit cuz that’s that’s one thing versus I don’t know like representing something with your dance you know. Yeah Straight up.

You know so how long ago was this that you that you linked up with Rock Force?

I got into rock force after I finished my masters so I’ve moved home and I think that was like about a year year and a half ago maybe two years almost now and I was totally not dancing that much actually like I graduated and then I was just working on starting this this business and then I got into rock force so then I was like you know what like I really love this dance man. Like it’s not something like when I was in school I’d kind of stopped dancing as much maybe like twice a week just for fun and then once I got into Rock force and I started seeing like how Ives was doing and like meeting my heroes you know like the Kareems and stuff like that yeah just it like I kind of like reignited a fire in me for sure so it’s been good to like have a little bit of a comeback and like try to get more involved in the scene again but yeah it was about a year and a half ago.

Okay dope and I know you mentioned I guess the two hours of two-step and yeah? That was crazy and given I guess studying and learning more about the history how does that affected your style or changed your style? Oh or the way you dance I guess.

I guess like it’s like I don’t I’m not really trying to be the craziest top rocker out there man like I love what YNOT does I love what you know these guys up top do it’s amazing and I think for me it’s more of an understanding of like where this came from and why it’s important like a deeper understanding than I had before. I always kind of knew a little bit about it you know but realizing that like what Paulski is teaching me is like a very East Coast traditional dance and there’s also like every scene has a tradition of dance within the breaking scene so I live in Tokyo now and I’m in a crew called Waseda breakers and that crew is super different in their foundation you know and if you look at like the West Coast we have a foundation to on in the Bay Area and throughout the whole West Coast including Vancouver and Vancouver has its own scene and their own history.

And so I guess like what I learned from them is what I learned from that from rock force is that the importance of protecting your tradition and your scenes dance and carrying that on especially going into the Internet age which is already like you know started in like 2005 or 6 right whenever I kind of got has got started but you look at older footage from like 2000 the 90s every country had this like crazy different approach to the dance and I think a lot of it gets forgotten now you know like certain viewers get popular and then everybody looks like that person.

And so I think what I really learned from rock force is not ok I need to do more two steps as much as like I need to protect my tradition and push it forward and so you know that’s why I still continue to do power I’m not trying to be kid Columbia he’s crazy you know like but I want to make sure that I can execute all the things that like my my teachers were able to do and then try to take it a little bit in a different direction like don’t want to take it more of a stylist direction you don’t want to take it a complete power direction you know but it was really just like the understanding that like all right like I’m a dancer and I want to do personally as best as I can but really this is a movement and my job is to be a good like part of that movement, push forward what’s important and and contribute something so it’s it’s really a conversation you know and that’s one thing that I learned from rock force too. is uh it’s it’s a long-term conversation over time like the history of the stance right but even in like the short term when you’re in a cypher you’re dancing with somebody else or when you’re in a battle that’s a conversation – and you have to use your dance to express that and to make sure that you are communicating and you’re not just like you know be on the craziest things.

One one of my mentors his name was Moshen he had the dopest his name is Moshen from skill methods actually he was in the Bay Area when I was in Beatz n Pieces, he’s from Canada actually from Calgary. Yeah I met him and he was down here in Vancouver I think last year or something. Dude he’s like he’s like the Morpheus of breakin bro mind of the matrix you know. But he kind of what was I what was I talking about shoot I just forgot. Cypher how it’s the conversation. Yeah oh wait oh man I totally just blanked he had like this uh he said something really dope one time and I totally forgot what it was just now. If I went back and listened to it I’d remember I’m so sorry. All good when you remember it DM it to me right away okay.

All right yeah really bring it up I’m sure it’ll come up again cuz um yeah Moshen just has a way of approaching breaking that was that was really influential for me I think in the way that I first thought about it… and oh man I’m so upset okay I’m sorry. what about this, influential how? All right well Moshe is uh he’s like a guru you know like the way he approaches it so yeah he kind of just like like the way I will talk about breaking or the way that he’ll help break it down for you is crazy you know so there’s like one time when I was talking to Moshe and he was like you know like if you want to really create a style just take take a take a pen and pad and like draw your character like in this world you’re this character right like you’re mad but like in this world the breaking world your whoever you want to be so dry your character and I was like what like it was like way too too crazy for me and so he explained it he’s like you know like if you look at abstract, abstract is a ninja like everything that he does is a ninja like if you see him move you he won’t make any sound that’s his character and if you look at lancer from calamities he’s like this like lao gangster like his whole style is like crazy out there and that’s what they represent so I remember like making like okay like what is mine then.

And I remember like at the time I think it’s different now is like you know I’m just trying to be Swift like a samurai like everything that I do should be like exact precise hit to kill there’s no waste and that was like why I went down that technical path was to do to kind of like fulfill what Moshen told me at that one point in time. So there’s like different ways to approach the dance you know and I think most is one of the dopest people to talk to when it comes to that you know like artistic expressing. So that wasn’t what I was gonna say there’s just way too many lessons from Moshe that I’ve gotten but that was one of the weirdest most actually helpful advice that I’ve ever had because it really helped me visualize like alright what am I trying to portray with these movements you know like what character am i representing on the floor. Right yeah I love how you got so specific on that like that’s awesome. yeah yeah oh yeah.

So would you describe your style now as as if you were the samurai or do you describe your style differently now?

no I think it’s it’s a little bit different now there’s aspects of it where I try to be real precise and I try to like you know hit to kill for sure but I think no it’s I don’t know I don’t think of it is that that way I think that was a great mind exercise cuz you can do it you don’t have to be that character forever you know you could be anything like there can be a day where you decide I’m going to be like an alien or whatever you know and go crazy with that style and it’ll add to who you are ultimately but when you’re on the floor you can be whoever you want you know and that’s the beauty of it so I think when I’m out there now it’s more of it’s more of me trying to just one do what I said I’m gonna do but then kind of Express however I’m kind of feeling at that moment at the same time you know. So if I do want to be the blow-up guy at that moment then I can be that guy you know or if I want to like try to just get in on some techs like some footwork patterns and techs or whatever I can get in on that too you know or if I’m really feeling the music then like I’m gonna be just be on the beat you know and it’s not limited to one thing but but yeah it’s a little bit I don’t know it’s always a it’s always a process of self exploration you know every practice every time you battle so it’s it’s a it’s a battle against yourself so how free you can get you know. It totally it’s kind of meta but it’s true. It really is man cuz like you can already do all the shit that you’ve been practicing you know and then it’s like a question of can you like in that moment own it you know and I think that’s the cool part about the dance is you never know. okay one hundred percent.

Cool so I guess it’s a good segue into uh I guess where your head’s at when you battle do you do you go into it really prepared knowing exactly what you’re gonna do or get into the music or wait to see what your opponent does and respond accordingly?

Um yeah for me and this is this is different for everybody machine is totally in a different world I think like I’m in my own thing so what I try to do now and it’s what I try to do I guess I’ll say that like as I progressed through my years of dancing it’s really changed so it depends on who I’m against like bum against somebody who’s I know I might maybe if I do nothing I’m I’m gonna just go out and have fun you know but if I gotta like go up against like somebody that I think is dope or like I’m gonna have a hard time with I’m gonna make sure that I stack up a couple things in my mind before going out like alright I’m gonna hit this this. and then it’s a goal of like how can I make this match to make sense and it doesn’t always have to be just in the sense of like how am I gonna smash this beat exactly a hundred percent sometimes like there’s so many more aspects to a battle you know like there’s the entire crowd, there’s the judges, there is the music, there’s a proximity to how close you are when you do something, there’s all these different variables that you can use to your advantage to win or or to lose you know. So I think what I’m just trying to do when I go in is in a high-pressure situation is just execute those couple moves that I want and once those are done once like I hit that first move, like I usually have a start and then I usually try to have a finish and then I usually have one thing between, so I try to have at least three you know and that first thing goes good then all the pressures off cuz then it’s like all right like it’s done like I’m feeling it right now. yeah.

And if it doesn’t go good then you can usually kind of see it with me which is something I should probably work on if I mess up man some of my stuff is so technical when I mess up it’s obvious you know yeah. But yeah once I hit that first thing it’s like all right now I’m just in my zone and I don’t have to think about it too much and then sometimes I’ll forget the second and third thing because it’s just like it’s already over like you know you won your round you know totally.

And then so you say like three things can you like explain like what exactly these are like are they combos?

Yeah so I try to be really well-rounded and I don’t know if that’s really the solution as much anymore when I started in in like 2005 and when I actually started battling in 2009 like I took four years before I started battling just to like build up confidence and feel like I can do anything you know right back then you could just focus on one thing there was there was a level of specialization that was okay and I just focused on power and as like the game is kind of progressed it’s become very much about being well-rounded I think that now because everybody’s soul are rounded there’s a little bit of a need for specialists again you know but when it comes to how I format my rounds I try to make sure that I have one cool little footwork tech one big power combo and then like a good clean freeze or like a really crazy freeze if if it’s somebody that’s strong you know but yeah I try to just go for like a complete package thing and then then on top of doing those three things protecting the music protecting like the tradition of where you’re coming from in your dance you know. okay. yeah so that’s kind of my approach to battles or like individual rounds.

Cool love it so it’s not every day that I get to talk to uh I guess somebody who’s part of such a like high tier like big major crews. oh for sure yeah they’re they’re cool man definitely amazing crews I’ve been lucky enough to be affiliated with you know. cool so I guess we haven’t touched too much on a with a Waheeda, Waseda oh Waseda breakers cool so I just wanted to talk a little bit more about uh get your relationship with those guys and what your practices are like and how they’ve influenced you.

Yeah so actually my purpose was getting down with while say though had nothing to do with me wanting to dance like Waseda at all and it’s it came more from a respect place for me getting down with them because like I said I come from a place I have a tradition and like now that I’m I’m in waseda there’s a little bit of a tradition there as well you know. I would say that I respect Waseda breakers because they’ve I feel like they’re one of the very few crews in Japan that has kept that Japanese tradition going. So when you look at how their younger generation dances like this this kid named Azuma he does power but he does it different like it is some weird Japanese power and hideki or bobu chanchin those are two other guys that are in the young gen they feel like they they’ve kept the waseda japanese style of breaking together in a place you know japan is a very homogenous society when they see something that’s cool they gravitate towards it really hard and when you look at them now like the current Japanese dance scene they looks a lot like skill methods a lot and then there’s like a couple kids who look Korean but doing that old-school Japanese style there’s there’s not that many who really kept it. And Waseda breakers as a crew has really kept that together and when they think about who they want to put into their crew their goal is never to like win the craziest next competition it’s always like well who kind of keeps what we’re about alive you know and and the the mindset that they have in towards breaking is that there’s always the mainstream and then there’s the anti and they kind of look at themselves as the anti towards the mainstream of breaking you know and how I fit into that is I just I’m a respectful observer. Like I love it you know I love being able to be around Otsuki and see like the crazy stuff he does that the the creativity you know and it’s just so different from my foundation that it’s like it’s always it keeps my practices interesting you know and I love just getting being able to represent with those guys.

Totally what would take it’s like inside one of those practices and is it really structured or you guys just vibing out.

Uh yeah they’re different every crew that I’ve been in has a different way of practicing and getting down so Waseda’s practices is uh there’s like usually two cyphers going and everybody kind of moves at their own pace. Like I always keep it like Cypher style like I go in and I bust my moves I try to make sure I hit tops I hit everything you know and I get loose. And they’ll go in and sometimes like somebody will like do move and they’ll mess up and then they’ll just sit there for a second and like rethink about it and try to like it’s a lot more choreographed in a sense with the way that they’re moving you know but it all comes together nicely when their final product is done whereas like with rock force it’s always a cypher practice and everybody’s going hard and that’s just like and I think that’s the the mindset differences you know with beats and pieces it was more like rock force but it had its own in its own differences too you know and so I think for any crew now like you just have to figure out what kind of like each each person is like a tool right so you kind of figure out what kind of tools you have and how can you create the best environment for each of those people to hone their skills you know and it’s gonna be different for every crew in every culture which is why it’s dope when crews come together in battle because you see those cultures clash you know.

Right one thing I remember when we did meet out in a Seattle was how proud you were to be repping Waseda Breakers so I think that’s really dope.

oh yeah man I love that crew if there’s they’re so dope they influenced me in ways that is not like like I’m not gonna go on and try to do like a floating leg moves like Otsuki you know that’s about but it’s like all like it’s it’s really refreshing to be like there is that way of approaching this dance you know cause like I feel like people get so caught up now I’m like I need a cool little quick thread here and then a freeze like this here you know and just seeing how they approach it and being so original with it is just refreshing.

Okay dope so I know you practice it sounds like a lot of your crew practices are cypher practices so do you also have I guess some solo practices or put aside time to I guess drill on that like the technical stuff and create your own?

Yeah definitely definitely so I actually only practiced with Waseda once a week and outside of that I have one practice with my friend from now or never’ his name is G and G is the man like dude he’s super cool and now he breaks still of course and he he’s also like started businesses out here in Tokyo one of them is called TNG as the next generation dance academy tokyo. And so because i helped him out with the studio here in there he lets me practice and use the studio and i actually do most of my practices by myself i would say three out of five practices a week are by myself. And that to me is when i hated it at first actually I like practicing by myself, but now I actually get annoyed when I have to practice with other people because I can’t like zone in 100% the way that I want and now my practice is I feel like I’ve been producing a lot more original things that I’ve been working on which I think we’re gonna come out in the next few weeks cuz we got Massive Monkeys coming up there’s a you know like there’s more I’m like getting ready to start battling more hardcore again and so having those solo practices is key if you’re even if you’re doing just like footwork like the creative aspect yes but in power moves as well being by yourself being able to like record watch tweak.

When you have your friends there it’s great for the energy of like go faster try harder you know there’s there’s that energy but when you’re by yourself it’s a technique game and that’s where I’ve been able to I think improve the most is in solo practice so make sure you take time to do it by yourself and if you can’t do it by yourself maybe you just don’t love it as much as you thought maybe you love the social aspect you know and that’s great yeah but yeah like if you can’t be by yourself and like really just attack me dance it might say something you know. Yeah 100% and I totally agree like when you’re when you’re training by yourself and you’re able to get inside your own head that’s when you create some of the I guess the most original stuff. A hundred percent man definitely definitely but also the collaboration aspect is important too so don’t don’t just shut yourself in a room and only do that make sure you you see the light of day and that people see what you’re working on so you get some feedback on it you know cuz it’s great – it’s great to like put yourself in a little hyperbolic time chamber but eventually Goku’s gotta come out and like you know defeat cell whatever so you got to do that too. Straight-up.

Take us inside one of your solo practices how do you how do you structure it do you have a camera what kind of music do you listen to?

I you know so just I want to attack the camera thing first cuz I think recording is important especially for me doing the technical things that I’m trying to do like I’ve been working on getting my ear flares back and I got them back out and say at this point like they’re pretty good but I wouldn’t have been able to do without a camera but here’s the downside to a camera you start recording everything and watching everything and then you’re not practicing so what I try to do is I’ll have like one day a week where I let myself record and I let myself like geek out on like what I’m doing right it wrong you know but then don’t do it for the rest of the week or like maybe twice a week at most you know because then you stop actually practicing and you’re just like watching yourself and it becomes just like a narcissistic thing.

So that’s the camera thing but the way that I will structure my practices is when you go in that’s and I learned this from storm I watched like this video of storm and he was like talking about how you have like five hour practices or something I don’t have time to do that unfortunately yeah so I try to get two to three in Max when I can and I go in there and I just try to make sure that the first 30 minutes is whatever I’m working on that’s technical and I need all my strength for so for now that’s air flares. So I go in I warm up and I do thirty minutes of air flares and then after that right now because I’m prepping for battles the whole practice is just running rounds like complete start to finish complete rounds whether I mess up or not like you just keep going because if you mess up on in real life like you don’t got time to like do it again you know so you I just try to go through the whole thing.

And lately what I’ve been adding in there’s this this German girl who came to practice one time and she taught me some stretches man like stretching is key so I try to make sure at the end the last 30 minutes is dedicated to conditioning and stretching because ever since I’ve really started stretching like my injuries have gone down my physical abilities have gone up and so that’s been the latest revelation like I learned this every two years like oh I have to stretch like an idiot you know but I’ll like stop doing it out there awhile.

So yeah I’ve been trying to make sure that the first 30 minutes is something technical the second right now because I’m prepping for battles is just running and then the third part is stretching. But if I’m not in like a prep for battle mode then I’ll do power for the first 30 after that it’s gonna be like running rounds until I kind of get tired and then what storm said is like all right you just lie on your back and you just kind of start getting wild so like that’s kind of where the creativity happens you know it’s towards the end of practice when you’ve exhausted all your power your energy and then you just kind of go get creative with yourself and see if see if this thing happens what happens then you know so that’s how all I’ll kind of portion my – my practices out. Okay dope love it and then you answered a lot of questions I was gonna ask which is probably.. my bad. No no you’re good you’re making my job easier. oh sure I just I get like I said I get on the tangent. Which is perfect.

One thing that I want to get a little bit deeper on then is the conditioning what do you do for free conditioning?

So I have this like p90x thing that I only have one thing and it’s just for ABS but I try to do that like twice a week and then outside of that I don’t really like mess with weights too much just because when I was in America I did. When I was living in America I did more weights I’d go to the gym but in Japan there’s not really like a good option for that that I found so it’s a lot of calisthenics different variations of push-ups handstand holds anything along those lines like freezes is a really good thing to practice. Actually I talked to storm at freestyle session last year and he was just like telling me about why calisthenics and like that type of practice is the best so he was telling me like just to go through different types of freezes like you… like it’s hard to explain without showing but alright so like for a windmill you need the turtle for use and for the halo you kind of need like this like high side chair thing or whatever and then need headstand and then need to go to handstand for 90s and air flares so he’s like you create a routine basically where you run through all of those freezes multiple times and not only is that gonna help you get stronger but it helps you with all your your technical and high level moves because you’re working those muscle groups in a way that is exactly related to how you’re gonna be using them in motion. So yeah it’s kind of like an extended version of stacks if you know the game stacks where you like add one thing on top of another on top of another of course freezes so it’s kind of like that but it’s it’s already decided from the beginning and you just do that like a few times.

Like if you watched Ives on his Instagram sometimes they’ll like post up his uh his stories and it’ll be like him doing like hand glide I’m sorry actually he’ll do like a reverse shoot through and then he like goes to a hand glide pushes up to a handstand hits a 90 brings it back down of a hand glide goes in the front again puts his legs out in front and with the shoot through and like that type of stuff is gonna make it so easy for you to execute your power moves when they’re going faster and you have momentum instead of just you know dead limbs and muscle.

Yeah totally like breaking down power moves into like their most basic form. Well not, just like you said exactly like you break it down into its fundamentals, you know and then when you put it together you like you refine all the pieces and then you put the puzzle together and it makes a lot more sense you know instead of just like trying to solve a puzzle with all these like weird pieces that don’t work yet.

yeah no it’s true it’s like when you’re moving and you have momentum sometimes a lot of the I guess technicality gets lost.

Totally it’s you can use the momentum to make up for things that that aren’t there yet in terms of technique you know like so one thing that I found lately like on my halo like I’ve been using momentum to get through this part but I’m not extending all the way onto the top of my head like I need to and I was like dude that’s why I’m getting this elbow injury you know. And so like figuring those things out it’s like it’s all it’s a technique issue that’s why I’m getting these things wrong and if you break it down to its purist like most basic form and you go through each form then the overall technique when it all comes together is gonna work out so much better but it takes time to do that you know and most bboys don’t want to do that, everybody’s concerned about the result and not the process so they’re like I’m just gonna throw an air flare right now it’s like well you can’t even handstand how you gonna how you know like fly around on one hand if you can’t even do it standing on one hand no so human nature.

No but you’re right it is a process and one thing that I love from my interview with YNOT is a he really emphasized like loving the process and how how breaking is a process but you have to love it and embrace it because it’s it’s all about the journey.

Yeah YNOT I love just like keeping up with him just seeing what he’s up to is like it’s so dope he’s such an inspiration man and he’s right the process is the most important thing because the result there’s like it’s short-lived you know compared to the amount of time you put in to get that result the process you can’t love the process and I think it goes back to what I was saying about like if you can’t break by yourself you know if you can’t love the process then you’re not gonna you’re not gonna get too far with it you know. You’re gonna you’re gonna burn out because you’re chasing a result rather than chasing the the actual thing of what it is which is the process that YNOT’s talking about so respected that guy man.

Yeah straight up, the guy’s one of my biggest inspirations is such a I guess an honor to be able to interview him so. Yeah he’s a cool guy man he’s he’s another like for me he’s like another Moshen, when I talk to him I’m just like like I just try to be a sponge you know just listen. Yeah totally and he’s a piece of professional and like every aspect of the word which is I love it. He’s so man he’s dope.

What kind of advice would you would you give to guess a b-boy who’s he’s in a place where he’s kind of lost with his dance?

You know what I would say man is like it’s the same advice that most gave me draw a picture like literally like if here if you’re your character what what are you as a character and then just try to like dance like that character you know or you don’t you have to draw a picture you can find inspiration for other places but I think a lot of people ways get very stuck in watching other b-boys and then they try to like they try to like define themselves based off of watching these other people and it ends up being derivative you know of like these other people.

So try to draw inspiration from other things cuz as much as I love breaking you know I try to make sure that I’m doing other things outside of breaking whether that’s business or a different type of art you know what I mean working with like illustration anything like that and you take like you gotta think of this dance is not like it’s not the end-all be-all this dance is an expression of your life right so if your life is lacking then your dance is gonna be lacking. So make sure that other parts of your life are a little bit full as well and take that inspiration into your dance. It’s a little it’s super like vague I understand but it’s it’s honestly the best advice that I have.

Totally it’s like it’s totally well set and it’s time to present you like I totally believe it. For sure okay don’t yeah I mean anybody out there who’s trying to get better you know like there’s a million ways to do it and like you can listen to me you can listen to YNOT you can listen to all these people but it only is gonna come from you whatever effort you’re putting in so you know study up but also make sure that you’re not just studying that you’re actually doing you know.

So very well-said love it man. For sure cool and you’re gonna be out in a Seattle pretty soon?

Yeah I’m gonna be a massive Monkeys entering with rock force and then I think I’m gonna be entering with some old homies from guerrilla warfare for style elements. And yeah there’s a I don’t know I think this year is gonna be pretty cool in terms of entering, we just we just won foundation like a couple months back the foundnation anniversary here in Tokyo is rock force you know, trying to work on some other big events that we’re trying to win to so it’s really cool to see how you know like Kareem, machine, and morris, it’s like these superstars in the breaking community it’s cool to be able to collaborate with them and see how they approach these these big these events you know and like what their mindset is going into it so I’m learning a lot from that as well you know. So maybe next time if we do do another interview I’ll be able to like talk about that more as I have more experience with it. Yes I would love to.

You hey what’s your uh what’s your squad looking like for massive monkees day it’s three on three right?

It is a three on three so it’s gonna be me Ives and Kareem this time so Ives just won the the American Red Bull qualifier and Kareem is one you know so many different crazy okay so I’m just like all right time for me to just not mess up.

Dope no it’ll be good I guess you wanna the 4on4 last time you’re in Seattle I guess the it was a sweet 16 I think yeah yeah that was cool that’s I got to enter with Jax, box-cutta who’s like the ultimate like soul shifter he’s all over the place all over the world and everyone so there’s him so we enter with Ali from what’s his crew, knucklehead zoo yeah Jax from now or never and then box-cutta and then we showed up and it was just like we just felt like jerks cuz we’re like all from different places we all flew in for this event and it was like it like it was a cool battle you know it was like definitely people were like teaming up with their homies type of thing it wasn’t like like we came in with this like messed-up squad it was not cool man so yeah sorry to uh next time we’ll bring my real squad. It was dope.

And I know you got a lot goin on what a I guess if people want to keep up with what you got going on where can they find you? Yeah so um like I said my uh my mentor Megaman he and I we started this thing called spin control and you can find us on instagram @thespincontrol you can also find me personally on on instagram @bboymattaction that’s pretty much the only place where I do anything breaking wise everything like my facebook is just like more personal at this point so like no point in adding me there. Yeah so I’d say basically those two things check out our website at spincontrol.co and yeah if you’re if you’re trying to like up your power game or whatever check out some of our products we got some really cool stuff coming down the line later this year. We’ve been prepping for it for a while so yeah definitely stay tuned and uh hope you guys support. For sure man I’m pretty stoked to hear uh-oh I guess to see what you guys are gonna be putting out there. So for sure well yo Wolvi thank you for having me on the show man I appreciate it. Yeah dude 100%!

All right guys you’ve been hanging out with Matt action in your host Wolvi head over to inthecypher.com search Matt action in the search bar and his show notes page will come up with everything and everyone we’ve been talking about today including all his links all his Instagram pages spin control the works. I just want to say big thank you to you met for sharing your unique perspective on this dance I love the stories that you shared and a really really unique perspective and taking us into your sessions so I really really appreciate it. Hope to have you back in the show man but until then we will catch you in the cypher. Fo sho, thank you Wolvi peace man.

And there we have it guys bboy Matt action, rock force crew, waseda breakers, really dope to have him on the show and share his unique perspective on coming up with these well renowned b-boys and being parts of very well renowned crews. And I’m really excited to put what he shared in the show into practice in my own training and actually I just watched a head spin tutorial that Matt action did on vincanity his channel so thanks Matt learning headpsins right now appreciate bro. So if you want a head spin workshop in your town hit him up it’ll be dope I promise. Definitely check him out spincontrol.co instagram.com/thespincontrol or @bboymattaction as he said in the interview he’s got some stuff coming up with spin control so definitely follow and make sure you don’t miss what he’s got going on.

While you’re checking Matt and spin control on Instagram be sure to give us a follow to @_inthecypher. There I share some behind the scenes and also announced the new guests. I got a bunch of people DMing me on guests that they want to have on the show if so if you’re not following us yet give us a follow; either comment on a photo or DM me a b-boy or b-girl you want me to have on the show and even better, let me know exactly what you want to ask them. It’s my goal with this podcast to help you so if I know exactly the information that you want I will do my best to get it for you.

I really appreciate the support guys it’s been crazy these past couple weeks but yeah. I’m very excited for this next episode to come out we’ve had a lot of people commenting and DMing me about this b-boying trying to get him on the show that had a bunch of questions lined up for him, it was a really really dope interview and I’m really excited for this one go live so follow us on Instagram people know right away who it is and when I’m gonna drop it. Until then guys peace out, take care, and I’ll catch you on the next episode. Buh bye.

Transcript

What’s going on guys! Thank you for joining me on this episode of the podcast. On this episode we got Matt Action on the mic. Really stoked to have him on the show. I originally met him last year in a Seattle Washington and a jam called sweet 16. Him and his squad ended up winning the jam I went to talk to him afterwards and he was super humble super passionate about his dance and that is why I want to get him on the mic for this episode. Now Matt has been affiliated with some really well renowned crew such as rock force and was Waseda breakers, but during has come up he’s been mentored by a lot of very reputable b-boys as well from various crews and you’ll probably know all of them. So super cool to get that perspective just to see how that influenced his style and where he’s at now with his dance. So let’s get right into this episode it’s a good one.

What’s going on guys Wolvi here and welcome to the cypher. On the in the cypher b-boy podcast I interview highly talented and experienced b-boys and b-girls and they shared their stories and knowledge with you to help you become a better dancer. Now joining me on the mic for this episode is Matthew Kimera Perez but you probably know him as Matt Action from rock force crew and Waseda breakers. He’s currently based in Tokyo but grew up in Fremont California. His teachers include members of beats and pieces, soul control, skill methods, and of course rock force and Waseda breakers. In addition to his breaking education, he also received a Masters in Business Administration from Waseda University in Tokyo. Combining what he learned in school and breaking has led him to become a founding member of spin control LLC, a company that innovates clothing to push breaking culture forward. All right Matthew really stoked to have you on the mic thank you for joining me you ready to get into it bro? Let’s do it.

Dope man I’m excited for this one. Yeah me too I’m excited to see what happens with this interview let’s do it. All right chill. Okay let’s just get started by telling us a little bit more about your personal life outside of breakin.

Okay just in general? Yeah just in general what you got going on what you like to do in your spare time. All right well I live in Tokyo, and I’m married to a Canadian Japanese person, she’s actually full Japanese but she grew up in Vancouver. So what I do outside of breakin is I hang out with her a lot, we go around Tokyo and do whatever we kind of feel like doing. Lots of good food out here stuff like that so yeah pretty much outside of breaking is hanging out with her or hanging off my my friends from Japan right now. Yeah it’s just normal human stuff you know.

Dope are usually originally from Japan?

No I’m from a town called Fremont in the Bay Area in California and I grew up there until I was about 18 and then I moved to San Jose for college and then I studied abroad for a year in Tokyo and I really liked it and so after doing that I went back finished school in San Jose and then I went to do a master’s of business degree at a school called Waseda University in Tokyo. So I ended up here and I was working out here and I met my wife and then I just decided alright I’m moving out here so that’s how I ended up in Tokyo again

Solid ok that’s dope and uh I got asked then where along those lines did you start breaking?

I started breaking when I was about 13, there was some kids that I started with that week they called themselves the AE it was like Asian something is just much Asian kids high school it’s like Jason, Jonathan Shay Ben Yen and Arnold Hwa and they were just doing flips and they thought it was breaking they didn’t really know what they were doing was tricking but I had a little bit of gymnastic experience so I was like oh I could flip better than them so like from the get I was just in battle mode trying to beat people you know. So I went out I was actually super chubby at the time and I just started like trying to flip and I totally got hurt and I was the worst one out of all of them so around 13 I kind of just like started trying to do stuff on the grass. Yeah from there yeah it’s kind of just a wrap from there got into it and got deeper as things went on you know mentors and whatnot. Dope what kind of who are your mentors I guess? Yeah so those those first guys we were trying to learn more about breaking and so we would just locally look around and we’ve met some people from different high schools and those people brought us to the junior college where there’s this b-boy name power surge from crew called beats n pieces and he had a class at this studio every Friday but it was like a college campus studio, he was teaching breaking breaking 101 I think is what it was called, so we snuck in.

We totally weren’t paying tuition or anything we just snuck in and like wanted to see what was up and he he was super cool he’s just a b-boy you know and he he kind of took me under his wing after that after a few months. So we I started breaking with them every I start breaking with beats n pieces crew like twice a week and I just really wanted to get down with that crew and then from surge I met so many other mentors like RJ, bboy cool Raul is his name, all the other beats n pieces guys, Megaman, that’s how I got introduced his soul control with Charles, and and yeah kind of went went from there I would say.

Very cool with the name like power surge he must be pretty cool. He’s a cool guy man he’s like actually he like he used to have some really good windmills like they were insane, I don’t know about now but he had like all the like I don’t know like into in the early 2000s there was like a bar for power and I think he he kind of had the basic power down but his name was Sergio so they gave him the name power surge and it was dope like I always wanted a cool name like that actually got my bboy name from him. He tried to call me Matt business for a while like some other stuff it just like wasn’t sticking and one day it just became Matt action and I I don’t know how it happened but I’m cool with it now.

chill, okay dope so then you linked up with soul control?

Yes so I represented beats and pieces for a really long time and while I was there in my hometown like I said is Fremont there’s this other bboy named Megaman and before I’d started braking he kind of had retired he’d already been to UK b-boy champs he’d been to like I think he’d been in like battle of the year they won the first freestyle session ever and he had already retired. So I didn’t really meet him until one day he just kind of came into the studio because he knew search and I met him and then after that I saw how crazy his power moves were and I always wanted a head spin. I could already flare, I could already like do some really bad windmills and he kind of came in and he just gave me all the advice that I needed and he didn’t come in a lot because he’s Megaman it’s like a crazy entrepreneur so he’s just like always doing other things now you know he still loves breaking but his main focuses those other things.

So he’d come in once in a while and then eventually I got his phone number I would be like I would call the guy at practice to be like hey this isn’t working like what am I doing wrong with this and he’d be like oh just just do this and this and this like if you talk to him he’s like the most upbeat happy guy he’s like yeah just just do that and let him call me back in a couple weeks so I would just call it and he would give me advice and then when he came in like I think that was a really big turning point for me because I learned from Power Surge I learned so much footwork.

Power surge is a footwork head and he’s got some dope footwork for sure I feel like he was underrated and then he wanted me to always get into more tops power surge but once I saw him make his power I was just like yo I got I gotta get that and that’s kind of where that’s kind of where I went for a long time was down that power route and I think that’s kind of where I got more my reputation from was being able to do power in the Bay Area because in the bay there were so many amazing dancers there’s like you had like roxrite, kid David, Morris Kareem, flexum. Like it was insane back then and the that generation they all kind of went different ways they all like kind of had life happens I moved to LA some of other places and then the bay was just empty and then I was one of the only few people who could like really execute high-level moves and I think that’s where I started to kind of get my shine was from there.

Totally and that’s I guess I discovered you as you’re such a I don’t know how to say like Dynamic dynamic explosive b-boy anyways that’s how I’d describe your style anyways you know.

That thanks man I feel like I’m you know I try to keep it going but the the kids these days are so crazy and I feel like myself as a dancer I’ve really changed I still do power and most of what I show on my like Instagram and stuff is gonna be power but I do feel like the core of my dance is now a lot different than just power so that’s been a cool little change especially since getting into rock force the focus is really shifted I think in my dance.

Totally and can you maybe go into what you mean by that I know you’re you’re pretty well-rounded like you got some really dope patterns as well like in your footwork but what do you mean by uh I guess getting into rock force now that changed your your style. Yeah well when I met well I got into rock force after I got out of beats and pieces. Beats and pieces was just like everybody was kind of getting older the demographic of it was just changing and anyway I got out of it and then Paulski approached me and he wanted me to to get down with with rock force and I was like all right and so I went to a practice and the first thing that they made me do was like two hours of two steps man like I was just going to steps and he was like nah the feeling you got had the feeling and like it was just like Paulskis really intense man like I feel like the guy probably eats eats his Oreos in the morning to Wu-Tang he’s an intense guy but it’s dope like he loves the culture so much and it shows in the way he teaches in the way he like works with his students.

So he made me like basically just start from Ground Zero you know he like made me go through all the music from the 70s when it started going up to – now and that was something that I don’t think Megaman ever really cared not that he doesn’t care I think he appreciates it but it’s not something that he studies in that respect you know he was more about the dynamics. So a lot of my earlier dancing is more about the dynamics and I think now I’m more about like I’m more about I’ve realized that I can learn all the dynamics and now I’m really trying to create something of my own a little bit more and really taking the heritage of the dance and make sure that I I like I’m contributing something rather than just like you know doing crazy shit cuz that’s that’s one thing versus I don’t know like representing something with your dance you know. Yeah Straight up.

You know so how long ago was this that you that you linked up with Rock Force?

I got into rock force after I finished my masters so I’ve moved home and I think that was like about a year year and a half ago maybe two years almost now and I was totally not dancing that much actually like I graduated and then I was just working on starting this this business and then I got into rock force so then I was like you know what like I really love this dance man. Like it’s not something like when I was in school I’d kind of stopped dancing as much maybe like twice a week just for fun and then once I got into Rock force and I started seeing like how Ives was doing and like meeting my heroes you know like the Kareems and stuff like that yeah just it like I kind of like reignited a fire in me for sure so it’s been good to like have a little bit of a comeback and like try to get more involved in the scene again but yeah it was about a year and a half ago.

Okay dope and I know you mentioned I guess the two hours of two-step and yeah? That was crazy and given I guess studying and learning more about the history how does that affected your style or changed your style? Oh or the way you dance I guess.

I guess like it’s like I don’t I’m not really trying to be the craziest top rocker out there man like I love what YNOT does I love what you know these guys up top do it’s amazing and I think for me it’s more of an understanding of like where this came from and why it’s important like a deeper understanding than I had before. I always kind of knew a little bit about it you know but realizing that like what Paulski is teaching me is like a very East Coast traditional dance and there’s also like every scene has a tradition of dance within the breaking scene so I live in Tokyo now and I’m in a crew called Waseda breakers and that crew is super different in their foundation you know and if you look at like the West Coast we have a foundation to on in the Bay Area and throughout the whole West Coast including Vancouver and Vancouver has its own scene and their own history.

And so I guess like what I learned from them is what I learned from that from rock force is that the importance of protecting your tradition and your scenes dance and carrying that on especially going into the Internet age which is already like you know started in like 2005 or 6 right whenever I kind of got has got started but you look at older footage from like 2000 the 90s every country had this like crazy different approach to the dance and I think a lot of it gets forgotten now you know like certain viewers get popular and then everybody looks like that person.

And so I think what I really learned from rock force is not ok I need to do more two steps as much as like I need to protect my tradition and push it forward and so you know that’s why I still continue to do power I’m not trying to be kid Columbia he’s crazy you know like but I want to make sure that I can execute all the things that like my my teachers were able to do and then try to take it a little bit in a different direction like don’t want to take it more of a stylist direction you don’t want to take it a complete power direction you know but it was really just like the understanding that like all right like I’m a dancer and I want to do personally as best as I can but really this is a movement and my job is to be a good like part of that movement, push forward what’s important and and contribute something so it’s it’s really a conversation you know and that’s one thing that I learned from rock force too. is uh it’s it’s a long-term conversation over time like the history of the stance right but even in like the short term when you’re in a cypher you’re dancing with somebody else or when you’re in a battle that’s a conversation – and you have to use your dance to express that and to make sure that you are communicating and you’re not just like you know be on the craziest things.

One one of my mentors his name was Moshen he had the dopest his name is Moshen from skill methods actually he was in the Bay Area when I was in Beatz n Pieces, he’s from Canada actually from Calgary. Yeah I met him and he was down here in Vancouver I think last year or something. Dude he’s like he’s like the Morpheus of breakin bro mind of the matrix you know. But he kind of what was I what was I talking about shoot I just forgot. Cypher how it’s the conversation. Yeah oh wait oh man I totally just blanked he had like this uh he said something really dope one time and I totally forgot what it was just now. If I went back and listened to it I’d remember I’m so sorry. All good when you remember it DM it to me right away okay.

All right yeah really bring it up I’m sure it’ll come up again cuz um yeah Moshen just has a way of approaching breaking that was that was really influential for me I think in the way that I first thought about it… and oh man I’m so upset okay I’m sorry. what about this, influential how? All right well Moshe is uh he’s like a guru you know like the way he approaches it so yeah he kind of just like like the way I will talk about breaking or the way that he’ll help break it down for you is crazy you know so there’s like one time when I was talking to Moshe and he was like you know like if you want to really create a style just take take a take a pen and pad and like draw your character like in this world you’re this character right like you’re mad but like in this world the breaking world your whoever you want to be so dry your character and I was like what like it was like way too too crazy for me and so he explained it he’s like you know like if you look at abstract, abstract is a ninja like everything that he does is a ninja like if you see him move you he won’t make any sound that’s his character and if you look at lancer from calamities he’s like this like lao gangster like his whole style is like crazy out there and that’s what they represent so I remember like making like okay like what is mine then.

And I remember like at the time I think it’s different now is like you know I’m just trying to be Swift like a samurai like everything that I do should be like exact precise hit to kill there’s no waste and that was like why I went down that technical path was to do to kind of like fulfill what Moshen told me at that one point in time. So there’s like different ways to approach the dance you know and I think most is one of the dopest people to talk to when it comes to that you know like artistic expressing. So that wasn’t what I was gonna say there’s just way too many lessons from Moshe that I’ve gotten but that was one of the weirdest most actually helpful advice that I’ve ever had because it really helped me visualize like alright what am I trying to portray with these movements you know like what character am i representing on the floor. Right yeah I love how you got so specific on that like that’s awesome. yeah yeah oh yeah.

So would you describe your style now as as if you were the samurai or do you describe your style differently now?

no I think it’s it’s a little bit different now there’s aspects of it where I try to be real precise and I try to like you know hit to kill for sure but I think no it’s I don’t know I don’t think of it is that that way I think that was a great mind exercise cuz you can do it you don’t have to be that character forever you know you could be anything like there can be a day where you decide I’m going to be like an alien or whatever you know and go crazy with that style and it’ll add to who you are ultimately but when you’re on the floor you can be whoever you want you know and that’s the beauty of it so I think when I’m out there now it’s more of it’s more of me trying to just one do what I said I’m gonna do but then kind of Express however I’m kind of feeling at that moment at the same time you know. So if I do want to be the blow-up guy at that moment then I can be that guy you know or if I want to like try to just get in on some techs like some footwork patterns and techs or whatever I can get in on that too you know or if I’m really feeling the music then like I’m gonna be just be on the beat you know and it’s not limited to one thing but but yeah it’s a little bit I don’t know it’s always a it’s always a process of self exploration you know every practice every time you battle so it’s it’s a it’s a battle against yourself so how free you can get you know. It totally it’s kind of meta but it’s true. It really is man cuz like you can already do all the shit that you’ve been practicing you know and then it’s like a question of can you like in that moment own it you know and I think that’s the cool part about the dance is you never know. okay one hundred percent.

Cool so I guess it’s a good segue into uh I guess where your head’s at when you battle do you do you go into it really prepared knowing exactly what you’re gonna do or get into the music or wait to see what your opponent does and respond accordingly?

Um yeah for me and this is this is different for everybody machine is totally in a different world I think like I’m in my own thing so what I try to do now and it’s what I try to do I guess I’ll say that like as I progressed through my years of dancing it’s really changed so it depends on who I’m against like bum against somebody who’s I know I might maybe if I do nothing I’m I’m gonna just go out and have fun you know but if I gotta like go up against like somebody that I think is dope or like I’m gonna have a hard time with I’m gonna make sure that I stack up a couple things in my mind before going out like alright I’m gonna hit this this. and then it’s a goal of like how can I make this match to make sense and it doesn’t always have to be just in the sense of like how am I gonna smash this beat exactly a hundred percent sometimes like there’s so many more aspects to a battle you know like there’s the entire crowd, there’s the judges, there is the music, there’s a proximity to how close you are when you do something, there’s all these different variables that you can use to your advantage to win or or to lose you know. So I think what I’m just trying to do when I go in is in a high-pressure situation is just execute those couple moves that I want and once those are done once like I hit that first move, like I usually have a start and then I usually try to have a finish and then I usually have one thing between, so I try to have at least three you know and that first thing goes good then all the pressures off cuz then it’s like all right like it’s done like I’m feeling it right now. yeah.

And if it doesn’t go good then you can usually kind of see it with me which is something I should probably work on if I mess up man some of my stuff is so technical when I mess up it’s obvious you know yeah. But yeah once I hit that first thing it’s like all right now I’m just in my zone and I don’t have to think about it too much and then sometimes I’ll forget the second and third thing because it’s just like it’s already over like you know you won your round you know totally.

And then so you say like three things can you like explain like what exactly these are like are they combos?

Yeah so I try to be really well-rounded and I don’t know if that’s really the solution as much anymore when I started in in like 2005 and when I actually started battling in 2009 like I took four years before I started battling just to like build up confidence and feel like I can do anything you know right back then you could just focus on one thing there was there was a level of specialization that was okay and I just focused on power and as like the game is kind of progressed it’s become very much about being well-rounded I think that now because everybody’s soul are rounded there’s a little bit of a need for specialists again you know but when it comes to how I format my rounds I try to make sure that I have one cool little footwork tech one big power combo and then like a good clean freeze or like a really crazy freeze if if it’s somebody that’s strong you know but yeah I try to just go for like a complete package thing and then then on top of doing those three things protecting the music protecting like the tradition of where you’re coming from in your dance you know. okay. yeah so that’s kind of my approach to battles or like individual rounds.

Cool love it so it’s not every day that I get to talk to uh I guess somebody who’s part of such a like high tier like big major crews. oh for sure yeah they’re they’re cool man definitely amazing crews I’ve been lucky enough to be affiliated with you know. cool so I guess we haven’t touched too much on a with a Waheeda, Waseda oh Waseda breakers cool so I just wanted to talk a little bit more about uh get your relationship with those guys and what your practices are like and how they’ve influenced you.

Yeah so actually my purpose was getting down with while say though had nothing to do with me wanting to dance like Waseda at all and it’s it came more from a respect place for me getting down with them because like I said I come from a place I have a tradition and like now that I’m I’m in waseda there’s a little bit of a tradition there as well you know. I would say that I respect Waseda breakers because they’ve I feel like they’re one of the very few crews in Japan that has kept that Japanese tradition going. So when you look at how their younger generation dances like this this kid named Azuma he does power but he does it different like it is some weird Japanese power and hideki or bobu chanchin those are two other guys that are in the young gen they feel like they they’ve kept the waseda japanese style of breaking together in a place you know japan is a very homogenous society when they see something that’s cool they gravitate towards it really hard and when you look at them now like the current Japanese dance scene they looks a lot like skill methods a lot and then there’s like a couple kids who look Korean but doing that old-school Japanese style there’s there’s not that many who really kept it. And Waseda breakers as a crew has really kept that together and when they think about who they want to put into their crew their goal is never to like win the craziest next competition it’s always like well who kind of keeps what we’re about alive you know and and the the mindset that they have in towards breaking is that there’s always the mainstream and then there’s the anti and they kind of look at themselves as the anti towards the mainstream of breaking you know and how I fit into that is I just I’m a respectful observer. Like I love it you know I love being able to be around Otsuki and see like the crazy stuff he does that the the creativity you know and it’s just so different from my foundation that it’s like it’s always it keeps my practices interesting you know and I love just getting being able to represent with those guys.

Totally what would take it’s like inside one of those practices and is it really structured or you guys just vibing out.

Uh yeah they’re different every crew that I’ve been in has a different way of practicing and getting down so Waseda’s practices is uh there’s like usually two cyphers going and everybody kind of moves at their own pace. Like I always keep it like Cypher style like I go in and I bust my moves I try to make sure I hit tops I hit everything you know and I get loose. And they’ll go in and sometimes like somebody will like do move and they’ll mess up and then they’ll just sit there for a second and like rethink about it and try to like it’s a lot more choreographed in a sense with the way that they’re moving you know but it all comes together nicely when their final product is done whereas like with rock force it’s always a cypher practice and everybody’s going hard and that’s just like and I think that’s the the mindset differences you know with beats and pieces it was more like rock force but it had its own in its own differences too you know and so I think for any crew now like you just have to figure out what kind of like each each person is like a tool right so you kind of figure out what kind of tools you have and how can you create the best environment for each of those people to hone their skills you know and it’s gonna be different for every crew in every culture which is why it’s dope when crews come together in battle because you see those cultures clash you know.

Right one thing I remember when we did meet out in a Seattle was how proud you were to be repping Waseda Breakers so I think that’s really dope.

oh yeah man I love that crew if there’s they’re so dope they influenced me in ways that is not like like I’m not gonna go on and try to do like a floating leg moves like Otsuki you know that’s about but it’s like all like it’s it’s really refreshing to be like there is that way of approaching this dance you know cause like I feel like people get so caught up now I’m like I need a cool little quick thread here and then a freeze like this here you know and just seeing how they approach it and being so original with it is just refreshing.

Okay dope so I know you practice it sounds like a lot of your crew practices are cypher practices so do you also have I guess some solo practices or put aside time to I guess drill on that like the technical stuff and create your own?

Yeah definitely definitely so I actually only practiced with Waseda once a week and outside of that I have one practice with my friend from now or never’ his name is G and G is the man like dude he’s super cool and now he breaks still of course and he he’s also like started businesses out here in Tokyo one of them is called TNG as the next generation dance academy tokyo. And so because i helped him out with the studio here in there he lets me practice and use the studio and i actually do most of my practices by myself i would say three out of five practices a week are by myself. And that to me is when i hated it at first actually I like practicing by myself, but now I actually get annoyed when I have to practice with other people because I can’t like zone in 100% the way that I want and now my practice is I feel like I’ve been producing a lot more original things that I’ve been working on which I think we’re gonna come out in the next few weeks cuz we got Massive Monkeys coming up there’s a you know like there’s more I’m like getting ready to start battling more hardcore again and so having those solo practices is key if you’re even if you’re doing just like footwork like the creative aspect yes but in power moves as well being by yourself being able to like record watch tweak.

When you have your friends there it’s great for the energy of like go faster try harder you know there’s there’s that energy but when you’re by yourself it’s a technique game and that’s where I’ve been able to I think improve the most is in solo practice so make sure you take time to do it by yourself and if you can’t do it by yourself maybe you just don’t love it as much as you thought maybe you love the social aspect you know and that’s great yeah but yeah like if you can’t be by yourself and like really just attack me dance it might say something you know. Yeah 100% and I totally agree like when you’re when you’re training by yourself and you’re able to get inside your own head that’s when you create some of the I guess the most original stuff. A hundred percent man definitely definitely but also the collaboration aspect is important too so don’t don’t just shut yourself in a room and only do that make sure you you see the light of day and that people see what you’re working on so you get some feedback on it you know cuz it’s great – it’s great to like put yourself in a little hyperbolic time chamber but eventually Goku’s gotta come out and like you know defeat cell whatever so you got to do that too. Straight-up.

Take us inside one of your solo practices how do you how do you structure it do you have a camera what kind of music do you listen to?

I you know so just I want to attack the camera thing first cuz I think recording is important especially for me doing the technical things that I’m trying to do like I’ve been working on getting my ear flares back and I got them back out and say at this point like they’re pretty good but I wouldn’t have been able to do without a camera but here’s the downside to a camera you start recording everything and watching everything and then you’re not practicing so what I try to do is I’ll have like one day a week where I let myself record and I let myself like geek out on like what I’m doing right it wrong you know but then don’t do it for the rest of the week or like maybe twice a week at most you know because then you stop actually practicing and you’re just like watching yourself and it becomes just like a narcissistic thing.

So that’s the camera thing but the way that I will structure my practices is when you go in that’s and I learned this from storm I watched like this video of storm and he was like talking about how you have like five hour practices or something I don’t have time to do that unfortunately yeah so I try to get two to three in Max when I can and I go in there and I just try to make sure that the first 30 minutes is whatever I’m working on that’s technical and I need all my strength for so for now that’s air flares. So I go in I warm up and I do thirty minutes of air flares and then after that right now because I’m prepping for battles the whole practice is just running rounds like complete start to finish complete rounds whether I mess up or not like you just keep going because if you mess up on in real life like you don’t got time to like do it again you know so you I just try to go through the whole thing.

And lately what I’ve been adding in there’s this this German girl who came to practice one time and she taught me some stretches man like stretching is key so I try to make sure at the end the last 30 minutes is dedicated to conditioning and stretching because ever since I’ve really started stretching like my injuries have gone down my physical abilities have gone up and so that’s been the latest revelation like I learned this every two years like oh I have to stretch like an idiot you know but I’ll like stop doing it out there awhile.

So yeah I’ve been trying to make sure that the first 30 minutes is something technical the second right now because I’m prepping for battles is just running and then the third part is stretching. But if I’m not in like a prep for battle mode then I’ll do power for the first 30 after that it’s gonna be like running rounds until I kind of get tired and then what storm said is like all right you just lie on your back and you just kind of start getting wild so like that’s kind of where the creativity happens you know it’s towards the end of practice when you’ve exhausted all your power your energy and then you just kind of go get creative with yourself and see if see if this thing happens what happens then you know so that’s how all I’ll kind of portion my – my practices out. Okay dope love it and then you answered a lot of questions I was gonna ask which is probably.. my bad. No no you’re good you’re making my job easier. oh sure I just I get like I said I get on the tangent. Which is perfect.

One thing that I want to get a little bit deeper on then is the conditioning what do you do for free conditioning?

So I have this like p90x thing that I only have one thing and it’s just for ABS but I try to do that like twice a week and then outside of that I don’t really like mess with weights too much just because when I was in America I did. When I was living in America I did more weights I’d go to the gym but in Japan there’s not really like a good option for that that I found so it’s a lot of calisthenics different variations of push-ups handstand holds anything along those lines like freezes is a really good thing to practice. Actually I talked to storm at freestyle session last year and he was just like telling me about why calisthenics and like that type of practice is the best so he was telling me like just to go through different types of freezes like you… like it’s hard to explain without showing but alright so like for a windmill you need the turtle for use and for the halo you kind of need like this like high side chair thing or whatever and then need headstand and then need to go to handstand for 90s and air flares so he’s like you create a routine basically where you run through all of those freezes multiple times and not only is that gonna help you get stronger but it helps you with all your your technical and high level moves because you’re working those muscle groups in a way that is exactly related to how you’re gonna be using them in motion. So yeah it’s kind of like an extended version of stacks if you know the game stacks where you like add one thing on top of another on top of another of course freezes so it’s kind of like that but it’s it’s already decided from the beginning and you just do that like a few times.

Like if you watched Ives on his Instagram sometimes they’ll like post up his uh his stories and it’ll be like him doing like hand glide I’m sorry actually he’ll do like a reverse shoot through and then he like goes to a hand glide pushes up to a handstand hits a 90 brings it back down of a hand glide goes in the front again puts his legs out in front and with the shoot through and like that type of stuff is gonna make it so easy for you to execute your power moves when they’re going faster and you have momentum instead of just you know dead limbs and muscle.

Yeah totally like breaking down power moves into like their most basic form. Well not, just like you said exactly like you break it down into its fundamentals, you know and then when you put it together you like you refine all the pieces and then you put the puzzle together and it makes a lot more sense you know instead of just like trying to solve a puzzle with all these like weird pieces that don’t work yet.

yeah no it’s true it’s like when you’re moving and you have momentum sometimes a lot of the I guess technicality gets lost.

Totally it’s you can use the momentum to make up for things that that aren’t there yet in terms of technique you know like so one thing that I found lately like on my halo like I’ve been using momentum to get through this part but I’m not extending all the way onto the top of my head like I need to and I was like dude that’s why I’m getting this elbow injury you know. And so like figuring those things out it’s like it’s all it’s a technique issue that’s why I’m getting these things wrong and if you break it down to its purist like most basic form and you go through each form then the overall technique when it all comes together is gonna work out so much better but it takes time to do that you know and most bboys don’t want to do that, everybody’s concerned about the result and not the process so they’re like I’m just gonna throw an air flare right now it’s like well you can’t even handstand how you gonna how you know like fly around on one hand if you can’t even do it standing on one hand no so human nature.

No but you’re right it is a process and one thing that I love from my interview with YNOT is a he really emphasized like loving the process and how how breaking is a process but you have to love it and embrace it because it’s it’s all about the journey.

Yeah YNOT I love just like keeping up with him just seeing what he’s up to is like it’s so dope he’s such an inspiration man and he’s right the process is the most important thing because the result there’s like it’s short-lived you know compared to the amount of time you put in to get that result the process you can’t love the process and I think it goes back to what I was saying about like if you can’t break by yourself you know if you can’t love the process then you’re not gonna you’re not gonna get too far with it you know. You’re gonna you’re gonna burn out because you’re chasing a result rather than chasing the the actual thing of what it is which is the process that YNOT’s talking about so respected that guy man.

Yeah straight up, the guy’s one of my biggest inspirations is such a I guess an honor to be able to interview him so. Yeah he’s a cool guy man he’s he’s another like for me he’s like another Moshen, when I talk to him I’m just like like I just try to be a sponge you know just listen. Yeah totally and he’s a piece of professional and like every aspect of the word which is I love it. He’s so man he’s dope.

What kind of advice would you would you give to guess a b-boy who’s he’s in a place where he’s kind of lost with his dance?

You know what I would say man is like it’s the same advice that most gave me draw a picture like literally like if here if you’re your character what what are you as a character and then just try to like dance like that character you know or you don’t you have to draw a picture you can find inspiration for other places but I think a lot of people ways get very stuck in watching other b-boys and then they try to like they try to like define themselves based off of watching these other people and it ends up being derivative you know of like these other people.

So try to draw inspiration from other things cuz as much as I love breaking you know I try to make sure that I’m doing other things outside of breaking whether that’s business or a different type of art you know what I mean working with like illustration anything like that and you take like you gotta think of this dance is not like it’s not the end-all be-all this dance is an expression of your life right so if your life is lacking then your dance is gonna be lacking. So make sure that other parts of your life are a little bit full as well and take that inspiration into your dance. It’s a little it’s super like vague I understand but it’s it’s honestly the best advice that I have.

Totally it’s like it’s totally well set and it’s time to present you like I totally believe it. For sure okay don’t yeah I mean anybody out there who’s trying to get better you know like there’s a million ways to do it and like you can listen to me you can listen to YNOT you can listen to all these people but it only is gonna come from you whatever effort you’re putting in so you know study up but also make sure that you’re not just studying that you’re actually doing you know.

So very well-said love it man. For sure cool and you’re gonna be out in a Seattle pretty soon?

Yeah I’m gonna be a massive Monkeys entering with rock force and then I think I’m gonna be entering with some old homies from guerrilla warfare for style elements. And yeah there’s a I don’t know I think this year is gonna be pretty cool in terms of entering, we just we just won foundation like a couple months back the foundnation anniversary here in Tokyo is rock force you know, trying to work on some other big events that we’re trying to win to so it’s really cool to see how you know like Kareem, machine, and morris, it’s like these superstars in the breaking community it’s cool to be able to collaborate with them and see how they approach these these big these events you know and like what their mindset is going into it so I’m learning a lot from that as well you know. So maybe next time if we do do another interview I’ll be able to like talk about that more as I have more experience with it. Yes I would love to.

You hey what’s your uh what’s your squad looking like for massive monkees day it’s three on three right?

It is a three on three so it’s gonna be me Ives and Kareem this time so Ives just won the the American Red Bull qualifier and Kareem is one you know so many different crazy okay so I’m just like all right time for me to just not mess up.

Dope no it’ll be good I guess you wanna the 4on4 last time you’re in Seattle I guess the it was a sweet 16 I think yeah yeah that was cool that’s I got to enter with Jax, box-cutta who’s like the ultimate like soul shifter he’s all over the place all over the world and everyone so there’s him so we enter with Ali from what’s his crew, knucklehead zoo yeah Jax from now or never and then box-cutta and then we showed up and it was just like we just felt like jerks cuz we’re like all from different places we all flew in for this event and it was like it like it was a cool battle you know it was like definitely people were like teaming up with their homies type of thing it wasn’t like like we came in with this like messed-up squad it was not cool man so yeah sorry to uh next time we’ll bring my real squad. It was dope.

And I know you got a lot goin on what a I guess if people want to keep up with what you got going on where can they find you? Yeah so um like I said my uh my mentor Megaman he and I we started this thing called spin control and you can find us on instagram @thespincontrol you can also find me personally on on instagram @bboymattaction that’s pretty much the only place where I do anything breaking wise everything like my facebook is just like more personal at this point so like no point in adding me there. Yeah so I’d say basically those two things check out our website at spincontrol.co and yeah if you’re if you’re trying to like up your power game or whatever check out some of our products we got some really cool stuff coming down the line later this year. We’ve been prepping for it for a while so yeah definitely stay tuned and uh hope you guys support. For sure man I’m pretty stoked to hear uh-oh I guess to see what you guys are gonna be putting out there. So for sure well yo Wolvi thank you for having me on the show man I appreciate it. Yeah dude 100%!

All right guys you’ve been hanging out with Matt action in your host Wolvi head over to inthecypher.com search Matt action in the search bar and his show notes page will come up with everything and everyone we’ve been talking about today including all his links all his Instagram pages spin control the works. I just want to say big thank you to you met for sharing your unique perspective on this dance I love the stories that you shared and a really really unique perspective and taking us into your sessions so I really really appreciate it. Hope to have you back in the show man but until then we will catch you in the cypher. Fo sho, thank you Wolvi peace man.

And there we have it guys bboy Matt action, rock force crew, waseda breakers, really dope to have him on the show and share his unique perspective on coming up with these well renowned b-boys and being parts of very well renowned crews. And I’m really excited to put what he shared in the show into practice in my own training and actually I just watched a head spin tutorial that Matt action did on vincanity his channel so thanks Matt learning headpsins right now appreciate bro. So if you want a head spin workshop in your town hit him up it’ll be dope I promise. Definitely check him out spincontrol.co instagram.com/thespincontrol or @bboymattaction as he said in the interview he’s got some stuff coming up with spin control so definitely follow and make sure you don’t miss what he’s got going on.

While you’re checking Matt and spin control on Instagram be sure to give us a follow to @_inthecypher. There I share some behind the scenes and also announced the new guests. I got a bunch of people DMing me on guests that they want to have on the show if so if you’re not following us yet give us a follow; either comment on a photo or DM me a b-boy or b-girl you want me to have on the show and even better, let me know exactly what you want to ask them. It’s my goal with this podcast to help you so if I know exactly the information that you want I will do my best to get it for you.

I really appreciate the support guys it’s been crazy these past couple weeks but yeah. I’m very excited for this next episode to come out we’ve had a lot of people commenting and DMing me about this b-boying trying to get him on the show that had a bunch of questions lined up for him, it was a really really dope interview and I’m really excited for this one go live so follow us on Instagram people know right away who it is and when I’m gonna drop it. Until then guys peace out, take care, and I’ll catch you on the next episode. Buh bye.

Leave a Reply

Close Menu